How to Sell your old Golf Clubs

There’s a solid market for used golf clubs

As you are perhaps “taking inventory” of little used or forgotten items in your garage or basement, you may very well run across a set or two of those old golf clubs tucked away in a corner, doing little more than collecting dust. After reflecting for a few moments on some of your best shots made and memorable rounds these clubs have brought you, you may determine that it’s time to move on and sell them. Knowing there’s a solid market for used golf clubs, the decision to part with them makes good sense.

To get the very best price for your used golf clubs, look into dealing with a golf center that specializes in the used golf club market. Superior, top-rated centers in Golf Digest like Palm Beach Golf Center do a considerable amount of business in used golf clubs, partnering with PGA.com Value Guide, providing determinations of golf club resale value that are consistent, accurate, and reliable market value figures for used clubs.

PGA.com Value Guide utilizes a real-time complex program combining statistical, programming, and golf club expertise. The values that are yielded can provide consumers and retailers up-to-the-minute access to what used golf clubs can bring to the seller if resold or traded-in.

Much like the ratings Kelley Blue Book provides for used vehicles, there is a rating scale for used golf clubs:

  • Excellent condition (High Value): Clubs that have been played, but show barely noticeable if any signs of wear. The club head will be unblemished except for normal ball impact and very marginal turf wear; grooves will be undamaged, in excellent condition; shafts will be the original ones installed in the factory; grips will also be original, in like-new condition.
  • Good condition (Mid-Value): Clubs will show some signs of wear, but will be very clean, with minimal marks or scratches; shafts will be original in good condition, or replacements will be of high quality and match original specs; grips must be clean, free of tears or rips.
  • Poor condition (Low Value): Visible marks, dents, and scratches on a well-used club. May have a replacement shaft if it was properly installed and conforms to good swing characteristics; grips should be playable with no rips or tears.

To get a good idea of what your clubs may be worth, look for a company and their website online. Access that website, input some information, and you should be able to get a much better idea as to what your clubs are worth in the marketplace.

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